Science, Intelligibility, Creation: How the Doctrine of Creation Unites, Delineates, and Ennobles Modern Science

  • Article
  • 19 pages
  • Level: university

This article (by Scott G. Hefelfinger, published in Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture in 2011) provides an overview of ancient science, contrasts ancient science with modern science, and comments on philosophy and modern science while promoting the idea of Creation as a means of tying all these together in a meaningful manner. Hefelfinger writes:

If the province of modern science seems today to be all encompassing, a quick survey of the situation will prove otherwise. Science can often seem to have no room for philosophy, no time for the immaterial, and no patience with God. Through all of these factors it seems we are left with no hope for reconciliation between science and philosophy, science and theology, and ultimately, science and ordinary life.

If a “theological doctrine” were to come to the rescue and serve to make sense of the divide between ancient and modern science that would indeed be something. This is precisely what I would like to suggest. I hope to show that the doctrine of creation best accounts for and makes sense of the situation found today between departments of science and departments of philosophy and theology: a historically diverging but essentially complementary relationship between ancient and modern science.

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